The science of health, wellness and sports performance is becoming more important and relevant in our daily lives. At the center of this is exercise and movement science. Exercise scientists work to maximize athletic performance while minimizing injury regardless of sport. Whether you’re interested in traditional sports, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) or wellness activities like yoga, a degree in exercise and movement science will separate you from others and put you on a path to helping individuals stay fit, active and healthy.

Classes start November 2, 2020, and January 11, 2021.

Small Class Sizes
Tuition
$450 / credit hour
Program Length 121 Credit Hours

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Flexible, convenient 24/7 online learning platform

Transfer-friendly program (up to 98 credits)
Financial aid available to those who qualify

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Degree Requirements

Core Curriculum

Course NumberCourse NameCredit Hours
HS-1201Community Health

An introductory course in community health issues, including basic concepts of community health; overview of government, foundations, private agencies, and voluntary health organizations; health care reform issues; the nine different areas of community health programming, such as chronic and communicable disease control measures, health promotion, and health education.

3
HS-2151Theory & Research in Health Promotion

Review of empirical research including basic interpretation of elementary statistical tests and techniques. Literature review of behavior maintenance, adoption, change and management theories drawn from the public health and social sciences.

3
HS-3250Designing a Health Promotion Program

Students are guided through planning and designing a health promotion program in a content area, setting, and population of their own choice. Prerequisite: HS 2151 and at least two health promotion electives.

3
EXM-2208Kinesiology

An introduction to the study of human movement. Sub-disciplines of musculoskeletal system; exercise physiology; implications for physical education teaching and sport performance training; movement issues across the life span.

3
EXM-3200Biomechanics

An introduction to kinetic and kinematic principles applied to sports and human movement. Topics include the study of the structure and functions of the body using the principles of physics and engineering.

3
EXM-3304Organization and Administration of Exercise and Movement Science

Emphasis on organization and administrative policies and procedures; purchase and care of equipment and supplies; public and professional relations; structural and functional aspects of a school program in physical education, athletics, and intramurals.

3
EXM-3305Physiology of Exercise

This course provides students with an overview of how physical training affects the human body. Topics include weight training, principles of training, as well as aerobic and anaerobic changes that occur from a training stimulus.

3
EXM-3308Motor Learning

An introduction to teaching and learning sport skills from a motor learning perspective. Open and closed loop information processing systems are used to describe and explain sports skill, reaction time, and motor skills. Theory and concepts learned will be applied to the everyday practical aspects of teaching and coaching sport.

3
EXM-3322Legal Aspects of Exercise and Movement Science

Relates basic legal concepts to sport and physical education environments. Includes torts, contract law, constitutional law, negligence, and Title IX issues.

3
EXM-4616Psychology of Sport

Introduction to psychological concepts applied to sport and physical activity. The effects of thoughts, feelings, and beliefs on athletic performance; various behavioral interventions for performance enhancement; peak performance state; team dynamics; team cohesion; coach leadership style and decision making; motivation; arousal control; concentration and attention control; anxiety-performance relationship.

3
EXM-4302Exercise Programming for Special Populations

An introductory course designed to provide exercise and science professionals with the knowledge and tools to successfully address working with individuals with disabling conditions. Topics include incorporating various modifications for individualizing instruction and for the inclusion of those individuals in games and activities.

3
Liberal Arts and Sciences
Communication3
Humanities24
Mathematics6
Sciences18
Religion6
Fine Arts3
Electives
Elective Coursework28
  • $450 per credit hour
  • Military: $400 per credit hour
  • 121 credit hours
  • Transfer up to 98 credit hours
Next Start Dates: November 2, 2020, and January 11, 2021

Freshman Admissions Requirements
Applicants seeking a bachelor’s degree must present an official transcript from an approved secondary school.

Students who do not possess a high school diploma must present a recognized High School Equivalency Diploma transcript of their NY State (or other) General Education test scores and a copy of their GED certificate. The total score must be a minimum 2250, with a recommended minimum score of 450 on each individual part of the test.

Transfer Students
Transfer students seeking a bachelor’s degree must present an official transcript of all previous undergraduate course work.

Applicants with a cumulative undergraduate GPA below a 2.0 can be conditionally admitted on a case by case basis.

At St. Francis College, we make it easy for you to see what credits you can earn from past college credit, work experience, specialized skills and training, and military service. You’ll have your own personal counselor to guide you through the process and uncover opportunities to maximize transfer credit.

We accept up to 98 credit hours of transfer credit toward a bachelor’s degree. That’s 77% of the credit you need! You could be just 30 credits away from graduation. Transfer student scholarships are also available.

Tuition Discount
Active duty military and veterans are eligible to receive a $50/credit-hour tuition discount, lowering their tuition to $400/credit hour.

Military Experience Credit
All branches of the military can receive credits for training, whether active duty, reserve or National Guard: Army, Navy, Marine Corps, U.S. Coast Guard, Army Reserve, Air Force Reserve, Marine Corps Reserve, Navy Reserve, Coast Guard Reserve, Army, and Air National Guard.

  • 5 credits: Honorably discharged veterans or active duty service members who have completed six to eighteen months of active service in either the U.S. Armed Forces or those of another country may be granted five (5) credits of elective requirements toward a degree.
  • 10 credits: Those who have completed more than 18 months of service may be awarded 10 credits of electives.

Additionally, ACE equivalency credits may be granted with the submission of an official military (JST, AARTS, SMART, CGI) transcript.

Core Curriculum

HS-1201
Community Health

An introductory course in community health issues, including basic concepts of community health; overview of government, foundations, private agencies, and voluntary health organizations; health care reform issues; the nine different areas of community health programming, such as chronic and communicable disease control measures, health promotion, and health education.

HS-2151
Theory & Research in Health Promotion

Review of empirical research including basic interpretation of elementary statistical tests and techniques. Literature review of behavior maintenance, adoption, change and management theories drawn from the public health and social sciences.

HS-3250
Designing a Health Promotion Program

Students are guided through planning and designing a health promotion program in a content area, setting, and population of their own choice. Prerequisite: HS 2151 and at least two health promotion electives.

EXM-2208
Kinesiology

An introduction to the study of human movement. Sub-disciplines of musculoskeletal system; exercise physiology; implications for physical education teaching and sport performance training; movement issues across the life span.

EXM-3200
Biomechanics

An introduction to kinetic and kinematic principles applied to sports and human movement. Topics include the study of the structure and functions of the body using the principles of physics and engineering.

EXM-3304
Organization and Administration of Exercise and Movement Science

Emphasis on organization and administrative policies and procedures; purchase and care of equipment and supplies; public and professional relations; structural and functional aspects of a school program in physical education, athletics, and intramurals.

EXM-3305
Physiology of Exercise

This course provides students with an overview of how physical training affects the human body. Topics include weight training, principles of training, as well as aerobic and anaerobic changes that occur from a training stimulus.

EXM-3308
Motor Learning

An introduction to teaching and learning sport skills from a motor learning perspective. Open and closed loop information processing systems are used to describe and explain sports skill, reaction time, and motor skills. Theory and concepts learned will be applied to the everyday practical aspects of teaching and coaching sport.

EXM-3322
Legal Aspects of Exercise and Movement Science

Relates basic legal concepts to sport and physical education environments. Includes torts, contract law, constitutional law, negligence, and Title IX issues.

EXM-4616
Psychology of Sport

Introduction to psychological concepts applied to sport and physical activity. The effects of thoughts, feelings, and beliefs on athletic performance; various behavioral interventions for performance enhancement; peak performance state; team dynamics; team cohesion; coach leadership style and decision making; motivation; arousal control; concentration and attention control; anxiety-performance relations. Credits: 3

EXM-4302 Exercise Programming for Special Populations

An introductory course designed to provide exercise and science professionals with the knowledge and tools to successfully address working with individuals with disabling conditions. Topics include incorporating various modifications for individualizing instruction and for the inclusion of those individuals in games and activities. Credits: 3

Liberal Arts and Sciences Curriculum

  • Communication: 3 Credit Hours
  • Humanities: 24 Credit Hours
  • Mathematics: 6 Credit Hours
  • Sciences: 18 Credit Hours
  • Religion: 6 Credit Hours
  • Fine Arts: 3 Credit Hours

Electives

Elective Coursework: 28 Credit Hours

  • $450 per credit hour
  • Military at an level: $400 per credit hour
  • 121 credit hours
  • Transfer up to 98 credit hours
Next Start Dates: November 2, 2020, and January 11, 2021

Freshman Admissions Requirements
Applicants seeking a bachelor’s degree must present an official transcript from an approved secondary school.

Students who do not possess a high school diploma must present a recognized High School Equivalency Diploma transcript of their NY State (or other) General Education test scores and a copy of their GED certificate. The total score must be a minimum 2250, with a recommended minimum score of 450 on each individual part of the test.

Transfer Students
Transfer students seeking a bachelor’s degree must present an official transcript of all previous undergraduate course work.

Applicants with a cumulative undergraduate GPA below a 2.0 can be conditionally admitted on a case by case basis.

At St. Francis College, we make it easy for you to see what credits you can earn from past college credit, work experience, specialized skills and training, and military service. You’ll have your own personal counselor to guide you through the process and uncover opportunities to maximize transfer credit.

We accept up to 98 credit hours of transfer credit toward a bachelor’s degree. That’s 77% of the credit you need! You could be just 30 credits away from graduation. Transfer student scholarships are also available.

Military Experience Credit
All branches of the military can receive credits for training, whether active duty, reserve or National Guard: Army, Navy, Marine Corps, U.S. Coast Guard, Army Reserve, Air Force Reserve, Marine Corps Reserve, Navy Reserve, Coast Guard Reserve, Army, and Air National Guard.

  • 5 credits: Honorably discharged veterans or active duty service members who have completed six to eighteen months of active service in either the U.S. Armed Forces or those of another country may be granted five (5) credits of elective requirements toward a degree.
  • 10 credits: Those who have completed more than 18 months of service may be awarded 10 credits of electives.

Additionally, ACE equivalency credits may be granted with the submission of an official military (JST, AARTS, SMART, CGI) transcript.

Multiple Areas of Study in One Curriculum

Our online Bachelor of Science in Exercise and Movement Science will provide you with a well-rounded curriculum covering topics like:

Kinesiology

Course No. EXM-2208
An introduction to the study of human movement. Sub-disciplines of musculoskeletal system; exercise physiology; implications for physical education teaching and sport performance training; movement issues across the life span.

Biomechanics

Course No. EXM-3200
An introduction to kinetic and kinematic principles applied to sports and human movement. Topics include the study of the structure and functions of the body using the principles of physics and engineering.

Physiology of Exercise

Course No. EXM-3305
This course provides students with an overview of how physical training affects the human body. Topics include weight training, principles of training, as well as aerobic and anaerobic changes that occur from a training stimulus.

Psychology of Sport

Course No. EXM-4616
Introduction to psychological concepts applied to sport and physical activity. The effects of thoughts, feelings, and beliefs on athletic performance; various behavioral interventions for performance enhancement; peak performance state; team dynamics; team cohesion; coach leadership style and decision making; motivation; arousal control; concentration and attention control; anxiety-performance relationship.

Meet Some of Your Instructors

John McNamara, PhD
John McNamara, PhDProfessor
Dr. John McNamara received his doctorate in kinesiology from Temple University in Philadelphia. He is a Level One Certified Olympic Weightlifting Coach and holds NSCA CSCS and CPT certifications. His areas of research include…

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Gerard Shaw, EdD
Gerard Shaw, EdDAssociate Professor
Professor Shaw’s background is in athletics and physical education. He earned both a doctorate in sport psychology and master’s degree in exercise physiology from Columbia University, Teacher’s…

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